3 Last-Minute Income Tax Strategies

Photo credit: Lendingmemo

Photo credit: Lendingmemo

Scrambling as we approach April 18th? Here are three last-minute tax strategies to harness for proper management of the deadline.

If you need additional time to file your personal income tax return, file an extension:

The deadline to file your tax return is April 18, 2016 (April 19, 2016, if you live in Maine or Massachusetts).

If you cannot file your return on time, apply by the due date of the return for an extension.  You can receive an automatic six-month extension for your personal income tax return if you file Form 4868 by the tax filing deadline.  (If you are mailing the extension, you should mail it certified with a return receipt, so that you have proof of the mailing date.) The extension gives you until October 17, 2016 to file your 2015 return.

This extension is for filing only and does not allow you more time, without penalty, to pay your tax liability for 2015.  Although the extension will be allowed without payment, you will be subject to interest charges and possible late payment penalties on 2015 taxes not paid by April 18th (or April 19th in Maine or Massachusetts).

If the amount paid with Form 4868, plus withholding and estimated tax payments for 2015, are less than 90% of the amount due, you will be subject to a late payment penalty (one-half of 1% of the unpaid tax per month).

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Conference Call: “Top 10 Signposts to Guide Planning for Estates under $10MM”

The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) delivered transfer tax certainty, large indexed transfer tax exemptions, and portability. Taking into account new norms, McManus & Associates, an estate planning law firm based in the Tri-State Area, today released a new installment in its free Educational Focus Series, “Top 10 Signposts to Guide Planning for Estates under $10MM.” During a conference call for clients, the firm’s Founding Principal and top AV-rated Attorney John O. McManus shed light on estate planning strategies that should be considered today following recent changes to federal and state laws.

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Time for Those in The Garden State and Beyond to Dust Off Their Estate Plans

For those who don’t manage to review their estate plans as often as they should, it’s time to break a bad habit: Revisions may be in order for many in New Jersey and beyond due to new tax laws.

Changes to both inheritance and estate tax will affect estate taxation. Here are a few items that should be examined now as they relate to your wealth transfer plan:

  • Earlier this year, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) became law. ATRA allows you to leave an unlimited amount of assets to your spouse. Children and other beneficiaries will be excluded if your will or trust says that your spouse will be provided up to the “maximum amount permitted by law.” Also, under the ATRA, you may give up to $5,250,000 in assets to a non-spouse, such as a child or your trust, without racking up estate tax liability.
  • The taxes of many couples in New Jersey and across the nation will be affected by the striking down of a key provision in the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Same-sex couples are treated as married for all federal tax purposes, regardless of where they were legally married. Additionally, New Jersey recently gave same-sex marriage the green light. Couples who were married in another state but live in The Garden State, as well as those who are just now saying their vows, should alter their wills and trusts to capitalize on these legal changes.
  • The estate-tax exemption for 2014 will be $5.34 million for individuals, up from $5.25 million in 2013.

Give McManus & Associates a call at 908-898-0100. We can help you modify your estate plan to take full advantage of the new rules.

Flickr/storebukkebruse

Flickr/storebukkebruse

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