Category: Media Clips

McManus Teams Up with Forbes to Shed Light on Elder Financial Abuse

forbes-logo-pngForbes Writer Ashlea Ebeling recently brought a very important topic to light with the help of John O. McManus and one of his clients: elder financial abuse. In her new article “Inside A Lottery Scam,” Ebeling tells the harrowing story of a McManus & Associates client, who – in her 90’s – was targeted strategically and relentlessly by unscrupulous phone fraud. From the piece:

“There was a man who was very friendly, very charming.” So begins the tale of a socialite widow from New Jersey horse country who lost nearly $1 million in a lottery scam. Call her Penny. She’s ashamed. “I can’t believe I was so ignorant; nobody can condemn me more than I do myself,” she told me on the line with her lawyer, John O. McManus of New Providence, N.J. “What’s funny is I’m a penny picker-upper; when I think of the amount of money that I gave away to an unknown person, it’s unbelievable,” she says.

How did the scammer convince Penny to part with a lot more than just pennies? “If she sent money, the caller said, she would have a chance to win big.” She started sending checks in hopes of hitting the sweepstakes jackpot, which would give her more money to make a big impact on the community by setting up a charitable foundation to honor her husband and carry on their family tradition of giving.

Bankrate Relays Investment Ideas from McManus in Feature Slideshow

bankrate logoBankrate, which has more than 2.75 million readers, recently turned to McManus & Associates Founding Principal John O. McManus for advice on investments and IRAs. His thoughts are included in the publication’s feature slideshow, “Traditional or Roth IRA: Find out which IRA is better-suited for high-return investments.” From the slideshow:

Pay upfront, watch Roth explode later

Do you benefit from having an extra-long time horizon? Then going full throttle in the Roth IRA is apropos, says John O. McManus, founding principal of McManus & Associates in New York City.

“If you can take a long-term view, opt for a Roth IRA and take an aggressive approach with asset allocation and investing,” he says. “Roth IRAs buy you a lot more time to allow the market to recover, absent the mandatory distributions of traditional IRAs. Create a self-directed Roth IRA and pour significant capital in it to build horsepower. Then smartly pursue alternative investments to generate the biggest returns,” he says.

“Private equity and real estate are the 2 best areas where real leverage can be achieved with a Roth IRA. The idea is to pay your taxes up front, then really watch returns from your investments explode.”

MarketWatch Publishes Article on Cutting Capital Gains Authored by McManus

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5 ways to protect your estate from capital gains taxes

Published: Dec 25, 2015 6:04 a.m. ET

Traditional estate planning is being turned on its head

By JOHN O. MCMANUS

The time-honored approach to estate planning is being turned on its head by significant tax law changes that have taken effect in recent years.

Long-term capital gains tax rates now range from 25% to 33% (when you add together the top federal, state and local rates and Obamacare’s Medicare surtax). So now that the federal estate tax exemption is $5.43 million ($10.86 million for a couple’s combined exemptions), many Americans may no longer be exposed to federal estate taxes, making taxes on income and capital gains more prominent.

In fact, some legal practitioners who spent the first half of their careers zealously transferring assets out of their clients’ estates to avoid estate taxes now expect to spend the second half pushing assets back into their clients’ estates because the estate planning paradigm has changed.

What are the best ways to strategize around capital gains taxes to keep them as low as possible?

Rundown of the tax rules for gifts

To answer that, it helps to first understand the rules about gifts and taxes.

Forbes Confers with McManus on Intra-Family Loans

Forbes

 

Are intra-family loans now a steal? According to a recent story from Ashlea Ebeling of Forbes, the answer is a resounding “yes!” John O. McManus recently spoke with Ebeling on the topic, of which you should take note. From the article:

The terrifically low rate you can use for a short-term intra-family loan is just 0.56% for loans up to three years. Go out up to 9 years and the rate is 1.68%. For loans of 10-years-plus, it’s just 2.61%.

As Ebeling points out, intra-family loans are a good option for parents and grandparents who want to help buttress future generations with buying a house or opening a professional practice, for example. And what if you were to loan $1 million to a family member who then uses it for a private equity investment that doubles to $2 million? From the story:

“I’ve just made $1 million on her balance sheet instead of mine,” explains John McManus, an estate lawyer in New Providence, N.J. who just helped a developer father loan his son the money to invest in distressed commercial real estate in Newark.

InvestmentNews Features McManus Column for The Tax-Conscious Adviser

Below is an advice column on capital gains tax strategies by John O. McManus that was published by InvestmentNews for its regular feature, “The Tax-Conscious Adviser.”

Investment News

 

 

tax concious adviser

Estate plans require a fresh look

Thinking around bequests shifts as capital gains tax and estate tax exemption rise

Nov 29, 2015 @ 12:01 am

By John O. McManus

Significant tax law changes mean it’s time to dust off your estate plan. Long-term capital gains tax rates now range from 25% to 33%, with the combination of the top federal, state and local rates and the Medicare surtax. This hike in capital gains tax rates, coupled with the greater federal estate tax exemption, calls for a fresh look at planning strategies.

With the current $5.43 million federal estate tax exemption ($5.45 million for 2016), many people may no longer be exposed to federal (and possibly state) estate taxes. Thus, maneuvering around capital gains tax becomes the primary concern.

John O. McManus Featured Expert for Next Avenue (PBS)

The following article written by John O. McManus first appeared on Next Avenue (PBS).

Next Avenue logo

 

 

5 Ways to Keep Capital Gains Taxes Down

How traditional estate planning is being turned on its head

By John O. McManus

November 23, 2015

FEATURED EXPERT

The time-honored approach to estate planning is being turned on its head by significant tax law changes that have taken effect in recent years.

Long-term capital gains tax rates now range from 25 percent to 33 percent (when you add together the top federal, state and local rates and Obamacare’s Medicare surtax). So now that the federal estate tax exemption is $5.43 million ($10.86 million for a couple’s combined exemptions), many Americans may no longer be exposed to federal estate taxes, making taxes on income and capital gains more prominent.

McManus Speaks to Year-End Tax Planning Strategies for Investment News

Investment News

 

Reporter Greg Iacurci tackled year-end tax planning strategies in a recent piece for Investment News. To help identify where the focus of advisers should be, Iacurci spoke with John O. McManus, estate planning attorney and founder of McManus & Associates.

The Investment News story, “Year-end tax planning strategies advisers should be considering,” encourages exploration of end-of-year tax considerations now, with just two months left in 2015. As Iacurci points out, “tax rules are largely unchanged,” so “tactics employed last year will more than likely still be relevant.”

McManus Raises Concern about Reverse Mortgages in Investment News Article

investmentnewslogoGreg Iacurci, reporter for Investment News, recently explored reverse mortgages, a type of home equity loan for borrowers age 62 and older that allow homeowners to access part of their home equity in cash. For his story, “Advisers like reverse mortgages, but only in unique circumstances,” Iacurci interviewed John O. McManus, founding principal of McManus & Associates, who shared some words of caution.

While reverse mortgages may be an ok option for clients who plan to stay in their home indefinitely and who could use some supplemental income, McManus warned against draining one of your most valuable assets to pass down to children or other loved ones.

McManus Interviewed by The Washington Post on Money Milestones

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Washington Post Reporter Jonnelle Marte recently interviewed McManus & Associates Founding Principal John O. McManus on financial goals that people should aim to achieve in their 40s. Jonnelle’s piece, “5 Money Milestones to Hit While You’re in Your 40s,” was published last week and re-published by Tulsa World on Sunday.

McManus’ insight informs two milestones from the article: one related to wills & estate planning and the other life insurance. From the story, here’s Milestone #4:

4. Update your will and estate plan: A few things may have changed since you last reviewed your will. You might have had another child, gotten divorced or been newly married. These changes would make it time to update your will to make sure your home, savings and other assets will go to the appropriate people after you die, Turner says. “If your ex-spouse is the beneficiary for your retirement plan you want to change that,” Turner says, adding that people should double check the beneficiaries for your 401(k) and life insurance policies.

The rules for how a person’s estate will be broken up after death vary from state to state, says Peter Creedon, a financial adviser in Mount Sinai, N.Y. For instance, some states may pass assets on to a domestic partner while other states will not, Creedon says, making the will the best method for explaining who should inherit assets. Talk to a lawyer or financial adviser about getting the documents in order. People with simple situations may get by using online services such as LegalZoom, which will create a will for prices starting at $69.

Parents should name guardians and put together a plan for what should happen to their children if they died, says John O. McManus, a trusts and estates lawyer in New York City. Those instructions can include guidelines for medical treatment and preferences on what type of school they would like their child to attend, he says. Parents who have amassed a sizeable amount of savings — think millions — may want to create a trust that would help them pass the money on to their children in a tax efficient way, he says.