McManus Weighs in on “Ways the Rich Waste Their Money” for GOBankingRates

GoBankingRates logoToday GOBankingRates, which has nearly 350,000 readers, launched an interesting slideshow, “21 Ways the Rich Waste Their Money.” For #6 and #7 on the list, journalist Lia Sestric shared two examples of wasteful spending flagged by John O. McManus, founding principal of McManus & Associates.

From the slideshow intro:

When you’re rich, you have more money than you know what to do with. But unfortunately, sometimes having too much money can lead to waste.

From the slideshow, here are two ways some rich people waste their money, compliments of McManus:

  1. Buying Ridiculously Expensive Cars for Kids

Estate planning attorney, John McManus of McManus & Associates, said there’s no reason to buy outrageously expensive, exotic vehicles for teenagers and young adults — especially those who have a record of making bad judgment calls. “A 21-year-old is still developing the frontal lobe of the brain where all the judgment and discerning ability lies,” he said.

Although certain luxury cars might become classics, some might not be worth the hefty price tag in the end thanks to depreciation. “The disproportionate majority of exotic cars more typically depreciate instantly when they roll off the lot,” said McManus. “Even if they don’t, the slightest accident can impact value permanently, sometimes to pennies on the dollar.”

  1. Trying to Launch Their Kids’ Sports Careers

All parents want the very best for their children, and rich people have the money to make it happen. And those who want their kids to launch a career in sports are willing to pay the big bucks to make their dreams a reality.

“Club team dues alone can be $3,000 to $5,000 a year, plus tournaments, private training and out-of-state travel, including flights across the country,” said McManus. But spending thousands of dollars on club teams and sports for a young child can be a total waste of money if the child doesn’t even want to be an athlete.

Here are expanded thoughts from McManus:

[6.] Wealthy individuals buying outrageously expensive exotic vehicles for still-developing young adults is one of the single greatest abuses often tied to the privilege of affluence—one that I hope to see infrequently in my practice. There is no sufficient reason to lavish a $250,000 Aston Martin on an 18-year-old or even a 22-year-old college graduate. The suitor for this 3,500 pound missile should not be a 21-year-old still developing the frontal lobe of the brain where all the judgement and discerning ability lies. Further, while certain exotics such as the DB11 may become an instant classic, the disproportionate majority of exotic cars more typically depreciate instantly when they roll off the lot; even if they don’t, the slightest accident can impact value permanently, sometimes to pennies on the dollar.

For the 21 year old who demonstrates advanced capacity to drive within the speed limit—a rare occurrence since the slightest touch of the gas rockets the vehicle to 65 MPH—this only ameliorates part of the risk: these exotics have very low clearance and their undercarriage can be torn apart pulling off the street heading up an inclined driveway or approaching a speed bump without aplomb and great caution or the inexact science of delicately approaching the curb in favor of scraping the nose underneath by getting too close. Further, law enforcement, not to mention new acquaintances, attracted to glitter and bling, develop the “mistaken” impression that one’s child is spoiled, flush with cash, and, of course, above the law not inoculated from affluenza. Red vehicles, often the color of the exotics, are pulled over more than any other color. These realities should paint the picture of a stop sign in parents’ minds. It’s not arbitrary that auto insurance companies charge male drivers under the age of 25 more for insurance; statistically speaking, they’re involved in more car accidents. Teens and 20-Somethings think it’s cool to drive fast; the rich should not strap their kids to a 3,000-pound rocket and expect to protect their investment and, even more so, their child.

[7.] While some rich folks feel like they have plenty to burn, spending gobs of money on a child’s club or academy sports career, frequently starting in early elementary and continuing into early adulthood, is an extravagance, more times than not. Club team dues alone can be $3,000 to $5,000 a year, plus tournaments, private training and out-of-state travel including flights across the country. Clubs justify that it is necessary for greater visibility of your child for their future careers, but more frequently the top motive is to get greater visibility for the club, to increase membership, and garner more fees. It’s a rare event that challenging and diverse competition can’t be had within just a few hours of travel. From traveling teams to high-dollar private coaches, clinics and tournaments, many wealthy families wrap up their dollars and time away from family and siblings in athletic development for years, only to be met with a career-ending injury, a burned-out teen, or the reality that playing professional or getting recruited just isn’t in the cards. One brilliant and thoughtful coach said, “If you want to see your child a success in life, get them a tutor for their studies and worry less about this team sport” – that is rarely professed.

Certainly, playing sports offers an invaluable learning experience for young people and can contribute to a well-rounded adolescence, but parents should do a gut check every year to ensure they’re not throwing dollars or family time (with the whole family) down the drain to live vicariously through their children. Vacations are missed, resentment is bred and thousands of dollars may be irretrievable.

To see Sestric’s full slideshow for GOBankingRates, click here.

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